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Starling Bank bids to defuse arguments over household chores

Treading beyond its traditional financial services remit, Starling Bank has created a new 'Share the Load' tool to help quarrelling couples track and fairly split their unpaid labour and household tasks

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Starling Bank bids to defuse arguments over household chores

Editorial

This content has been selected, created and edited by the Finextra editorial team based upon its relevance and interest to our community.

A typical couple will do on average 63 hours of unpaid household work each week, according to Starling Bank’s survey of more than 4,000 straight and 250 LGBTQ+ cohabiting couples.

While nearly three quarters (72%) of women surveyed say they do the majority of household tasks in their relationship, just 18% of men agree their partner does the most. Meanwhile, 44% of men report doing the most at home, while just 6% of women agree.

Available online and via the app, Starling Bank's Share the Load tool tracks the division of labour among quarrelsome couple, providing an at-a-glance view of how household tasks are shared.

Rachel Kerrone, family finance expert at Starling Bank says: “Not many couples in the UK share the load equally when it comes to household admin and chores, and fewer seem to agree on how much the other person does.

“To help couples gain better balance at home, we’ve created the Share the Load tool, which allows people to see how household tasks are really split with their other half. We want to make conversations around household equality easier and clearer, which is why we’ve made the tool free for everyone to use.”

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